Ahead Of The Curve with Jonathan Gelnar

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January 16, 2020  

Demetre Kokoris- MiLB Pitching Coach, Toronto Blue Jays

During this episode of Ahead of the Curve, I interviewed Demetre Kokoris, Pitching Coach for the Vancouver Canadians, an affiliate team of the Toronto Blue Jays. Demetre Kokoris expresses his dedication to the game of baseball, the ways he solves problems with pitching development, strategies to enhance skill acquisition, communicating with players, and prioritizing individual player development within the team structure. 

 

Episode Highlights: 

 

  • How did Demetre Kokoris get involved in baseball and as a coach?   
  • What should off-season pitching development look like? 
  • Are there any common problems that he sees with development?  
  • How does Demetre use video in training? 
  • What is an area of skill acquisition that Demetre has gotten better at? 
  • What is Demetre Kokoris’ advice regarding prioritizing individual development within the team setting with a small budget or a small staff?  
  • How does he communicate particular needs with players? 
  • In what ways does he assist players whom English isn’t their first language?   
  • How does he tackle workload management? 
  • What are some of Demetre Kokoris’ favorite data to track?  
  • What is something that Demetre is excited about learning and applying? 
  • What are things his players get excited about doing during practice?   
  • Which three pitching tools would Demetre Kokoris focus on if he could only have three? 
  • Is there anything that Demetre Kokoris believes that other coaches might disagree with?
  • Which resources does Demetre recommend? 
  • The more information you put out the more information that comes back to you.
  • Be sure to learn everyday. 

 

3 Key Points:

  1. The more athletic and fluid players can be, and the better they understand the game, the better off they can be on the backend.
  2. Is a particular weakness a detriment to the club or to the individual? Or is it just something that would just be nice to have corrected?  
  3. You’ve got to listen to your player and find out what that player thinks is going on and his impression of his skillset. 

 

Tweetable Quotes:

  • “What I learned at the collegiate level that I saw guys be very successful with was, your off-season is your best opportunity to change your body.” – Demetre Kokoris (03:13)
  • “With the off-season there is no competitive environment. So, it’s your chance to really slow things down from a movement standpoint on your throwing. So, I think that is your best opportunity if you want to make a mechanical adjustment.” – Demetre Kokoris (03:50)
  • “At the age of 24, I took my first yoga class and I felt like I really felt my body and was able to begin to get a lot more coordinated.” – Demetre Kokoris  (04:15)
  • “When kids play the game of baseball and they start competing and they start learning the little nuances and the tactics of the game, that’s when they start doing things instinctually.” – Demetre Kokoris (06:46)
  • “As far as skill acquisition is concerned, I think the things that I always go back to are, start with the anatomy, is making sure the guy is physically capable of performing the thing that you need.” – Demetre Kokoris (12:14)
  • “I think first and foremost, you’ve got to understand your team and what you need each person to do. What role do they play?” – Demetre Kokoris (15:35)
  • “If you do want to make changes, is having objective data. Showing him. Showing him with the numbers. ‘Hey man, I know you think your knuckleball is a good pitch. But you throw this at a 20% strike clip in such-in-such situations.” – Demetre Kokoris (19:07)
  • “I think you have to take it back to the three things that you want to do with a pitch. Do you want it for called strike? Do you want it for a swing and miss? Or do you want it for weak contact?” – Demetre Kokoris (19:50)

Resources Mentioned: 

January 9, 2020  

Reggie Christiansen- Head Baseball Coach, Sacramento State (CA)

During this episode of Ahead of the Curve, I interviewed Reggie Christiansen, Head Coach of the Sacramento State Hornets college baseball team. Reggie Christiansen talks about the important balance between developing players individually and as a collective team, how a typical week of training unfolds, how he goes about getting to know his players better, and recommendations for building a productive team culture. 

 

Episode Highlights: 

  • How did Reggie Christiansen get involved in baseball and as a coach?   
  • What were the first steps Reggie took as a head coach? 
  • What did his team do last fall when his players started to report? 
  • What are they doing on a daily basis to build the team culture? 
  • How does he get players to buy into the individual player concept and the collective team concept? 
  • What ways does Reggie Christiansen get to know his players better? 
  • Does he have a process to help his assistant coaches to grow? 
  • What are some different competitions that he loves to use with his players?  
  • What are some important rules and standards that his team organization has? 
  • Reggie Christiansen talks about what they are doing this spring and making practices more efficient. 
  • What advice does he have for guys getting into their first year of head coaching? 
  • What are things his players get excited about doing during practice?   
  • What is something done during practice that his players really love? 
  • Is there anything that Reggie Christiansen believes that other coaches might disagree with?
  • Which things that typically happen during practice would we notice? 
  • Are there any resources that Reggie Christiansen would recommend? 
  • Remember why we all got into baseball to begin with.  

 

3 Key Points:

  1. Put players in training situations where they have to overcome fears and to evolve as a team.  
  2. Take ownership of your performance and be honest about your mistakes. 
  3. Balance routine training elements with switching things up.  

 

Tweetable Quotes:

  • “When I was in high school I coached middle school basketball and I actually coached little league baseball when  I was in high school my senior year. I just fell in love with the organization of putting practices together.” – Reggie Christiansen (00:40)
  • “I think you are probably short-changing your players if you are trying to do everything.” – Reggie Christiansen (06:09)
  • “I think that my job as a head coach is to really allow these guys to chase their dreams individually, and obviously we have team goals as well. So there is a balance.” – Reggie Christiansen (10:00)
  • “Mondays and Wednesdays are very individual skill-based. The focus is on the player...We built Tuesday and Thursday night practices where the focus would be on the team...Friday would be a very short practice.” – Reggie Christiansen (10:50)
  • “I think our players understand that I do care about them individually. But, we also need to make sure that the team component is at the forefront.” – Reggie Christiansen (11:27)
  • “We do some other things that I would call, ‘shared diversity.’ Some might call it ‘shared suffering.’ We try to have as much competition or put them in some experiences that allow them to grow together.” – Reggie Christiansen (11:37)
  • “Give the new guys more of an opportunity to talk a little bit more, to ask questions, to open a little bit, because I think those guys are somewhat pleasers, right? They want to say and do what they think we want.” – Reggie Christiansen (16:04)
  • “I want their best effort all the time. I think that it is simple as that. There is nothing that frustrates you more than seeing a guy not run hard. Just do what you are supposed to do.” – Reggie Christiansen (23:27)

 

Resources Mentioned: 

January 2, 2020  

Lorenzo Garmendia- Professional Swing Consultant and Founder of Gradum Baseball

During this episode of Ahead of the Curve, I interviewed Lorenzo Garmendia, Founder of Gradum Baseball. Lorenzo shares information about his experiences training players from the major league all the way down to children. Lorenzo Garmendia also talks about exit velocity, launch angles, swinging flaws, and how hockey is a great way to train for baseball. 

Episode Highlights: 

  • How did Lorenzo Garmendia get involved in baseball and as a coach?   
  • What is Lorenzo doing with players for training? 
  • What are the first things Lorenzo Garmendia does with players?
  • Lorenzo talks about the Tuesday Teaching videos.  
  • How does Lorenzo go about analyzing a player’s videos?
  • What are some things that players are doing the same? 
  • What are some practical ways that Lorenzo helps players train their swing in practice? 
  • Is he training swings with slider pitches in practice?  
  • What spin rate does he want players to be able to be within?
  • How does Lorenzo train players for decision-making? 
  • What is the best way to train hitters individually? 
  • How do you balance between staying directionally center to swinging pull side?
  • What types of tools are Lorenzo using? 
  • Lorenzo shares his theories on exit velocity and launch angles. 
  • What are things his players get excited about doing? 
  • Is there anything that Lorenzo Garmendia believes that other coaches might disagree with?  
  • Which things that happen during practice typically that we would notice? 
  • What are some learning things that Lorenzo Garmendia is excited about?

3 Key Points:

  1. There are typically fives hitting flaws that you can train players on after accessing each player’s swing individually? 
  2. Hitting is a physics equation. It is force equals mass times acceleration. It is the force you impart into the ball for exit velocity. 
  3. The best launch angle you want as a hitter is 25 degrees. If you hit a ball at 25 degrees at a 100 miles-per-hour exit velocity, you are hitting a home run to dead center in any stadium in the United States. 

 

Tweetable Quotes:

  • “I have a mathematical background and I was looking at it like, God, what they (coaches) are teaching them (players) really doesn’t make sense from a hitting perspective and from a pitching velocity perspective.” – Lorenzo Garmendia (01:10)
  • “The first thing I look at is lower half. So, one of the main things is if you aren’t using your legs in the swing you’re not going to be very successful.” – Lorenzo Garmendia (05:50)
  • “The biggest thing we see is what we call, ‘Whether you’re a pusher or do you swing the bat?’ Do you push your hands and your hands swing the bat? Or are you letting your body sequence correctly and the body swinging the bat?” – Lorenzo Garmendia (06:01)
  • “Watch a hockey game and if let’s say the goalie is in front of you, you’ll never see a hockey player come around a puck. They are always to and through it. So, when you look at direction, that is huge in regards to baseball.” – Lorenzo Garmendia (06:16)
  • “Every player was taught east to west. When in reality the object of the game is to hit the ball forward. So if you want to hit the ball forward, technically you want to be working from back to front south to north.” – Lorenzo Garmendia (06:35)
  • “Even at the highest levels, guys don’t know what they’re doing. And what I mean by they don’t know what they’re doing, they don’t know what they’re swing is supposed to be doing or how they can repeat it.” – Lorenzo Garmendia (09:22)
  • “Let’s train the swing to be able to hit every pitcher’s pitch and then let’s go to work.” – Lorenzo Garmendia (13:39)
  • “Contact point is huge. But contact point is determined by the pitcher and where you make contact.” – Lorenzo Garmendia (25:08)

Resources Mentioned: 

December 23, 2019  
December 19, 2019  

Tyger Pederson- MiLB Hitting Coach, St. Louis Cardinals

During this episode of Ahead of the Curve, I interviewed Tyger Pederson, Hitting Coach at St. Louis Cardinals. Tyger discusses working with amateur players as well as more experienced players, communicating with players with whom English isn’t their first language, helping hitter improve their adjustability, and the importance of players getting into a good hitting position. 

Episode Highlights: 

 

  • How did Tyger Pederson get involved in baseball and as a coach?   
  • What are some of his main goals for the off-season? 
  • What are some resources that Tyger is making use of? 
  • What is Tyger’s process for working with amateur players? 
  • How does he approach more experienced players? 
  • What are some different ways that Tyger trains for adjustability? 
  • How does Tyger help out with decision-making? 
  • Is there anything that Tyger Pederson is very intentional with players? 
  • Does he ask more questions than give answers?
  • How does Tyger work with players when English isn’t their first language? 
  • What do conversations look like when communicating from the top down?
  • How does he communicate with players when emotions can run high?
  • What does his pre-game time look like? 
  • How does he balance individual training for each player? 
  • What are some training things that Tyger is excited about?
  • Are there training activities that his players love to do?
  • What are the three things we would notice if we watched Tyger Pederson’s practice?
  • What are some of Tyger Pederson’s favorite books and resources? 

 

3 Key Points:

  1. Never stop learning. 
  2. Get to know your players, what they need, what works best for them, and what their goals are. 
  3. Hitting adjustability is key. Pitchers are getting better and better. Hitters need to make better decisions when they decide to swing. 

 

Tweetable Quotes:

  • “I grew up in a baseball family in Palo Alto, California. My dad played 13 years professionally and definitely raised me and all my siblings up in a sport athletic environment.” – Tyger Pederson (00:26)
  • “There comes that time in everybody’s career where you kind of decide what’s going to be the best move for you after your baseball playing career and I always knew that I wanted to be a coach.” – Tyger Pederson (01:14)
  • “I would say one of my main goals as a coach is to definitely to continue learning. Continue to develop as a coach.” – Tyger Pederson (03:14)
  • “When I get an amateur player who wants to work with me I usually start trying to get to know them as well as I can. Ask them about where they have been and their experiences and are they working on anything.” – Tyger Pederson (07:05)
  • “A lot of amateur players have different goals and a lot of people aspire to play at the higher level. Maybe it’s college, maybe it’s pro. Some amateur players just want to have fun and enjoy their time.” – Tyger Pederson (07:52)
  • “Being able to move efficiently and get yourself into a good hitting position is the number one most important thing. Once you can get into a good position and move efficiently it definitely promotes adjustability.” – Tyger Pederson (11:32)
  • “Being able to challenge yourself in an environment where you can feel your misses is really important. The importance of feeling your misses is now you see where your swing is breaking down.” – Tyger Pederson (11:53)
  • “I think it is really important to create a setting where you are challenging hitters to make game-like decisions.” – Tyger Pederson (13:36)

Resources Mentioned: 

December 12, 2019  

Jon Shehan- Head Baseball Coach, Millersville University (PA)

During this episode of Ahead of the Curve, I interviewed Jon Shehan, Head Baseball Coach at Millersville Univ. NCAA D2. Jon discusses the importance of coaches being humble and admitting that they don’t know everything, creating an enjoyable environment to make players love coming to baseball practice, and ways to adapt practice time to player’s needs. 

 

Episode Highlights: 

  • How did Jon Shehan get involved in baseball and as a coach?   
  • What were some of Jon’s first steps when he became a head coach? 
  • What is he doing with the time and staff he has? 
  • Are there things that have worked for team culture building? 
  • How can you go about relationships with players individually?
  • What is he doing to make the lives of his assistant coaches easier? 
  • What are some other rules and standards he has in his baseball program? 
  • What are some different practice plan tips Jon Shehan recommends? 
  • If Jon Shehan could go back to being a first-year head coach, what advice would he have for himself? 
  • What are some training things that Jon is excited about?
  • Are there training activities that his players love to do?
  • What are the three things we would notice if we watched Jon Shehan’s practice?
  • What are some of Jon Shehan’s favorite books and resources? 

 

3 Key Points:

  1. Jon Shehan’s players track their nutrition using apps every single day and turn their numbers in on Friday mornings. 
  2. Jon Shehan has read and recommends the book “Old School vs. New School” by Eugene Bleeker. Jon has read it twice now. 
  3. Try changing practice activities every 5-10 minutes. 

Tweetable Quotes:

  • “For the young coaches out there, man, just don’t be afraid to dream.” – Jon Shehan (05:08)
  • “The guys that work for nothing are probably your most valuable resource and you have to find ways to thank them, and keep them involved, and keep challenging them as well. Not overwork them, but challenge them.” – Jon Shehan (07:21)
  • “Being able to take that data, then show it to the players has been crucial for us. Because so many of these guys feel like things are going the right way. But I think what we have done is speed up the development process.” – Jon Shehan (09:47)
  • “At the end of the day, our values aren’t going to change. That is what you are signing up for. Because we may find something better next week that we are going to adapt and put into our program..” – Jon Shehan (16:10)
  • “Making it intentional that we are building relationships with each and every individual on the team, even though it is a competitive environment. And maybe one of the toughest things we have to do.” – Jon Shehan (17:36)
  • “One of the interesting things we do as a team the first week of class every year is going over those core covenants, and first ask, ‘Are there any other values that we need to add?’” – Jon Shehan (26:00)
  • “One of the biggest values, sometimes, it’s a blessing and a course, is...make it better. It’s just simple, make it better.” – Jon Shehan (42:33)
  • “One of my biggest theories is making practice fun. I want our guys to show up and enjoy practice and have it be one of the best parts of their day.” – Jon Shehan (46:07)

Resources Mentioned: 

Book: “Old School vs. New School” by Eugene Bleeker

December 5, 2019  

Jason Bell- MiLB Field Coordinator, Houston Astros

During this episode of Ahead of the Curve, I interview Jason Bell, MiLB Field Coordinator for the Houston Astros. Jason Bell talks about the art of cultivating team culture, methods to adapting your coaching style to your various players, and his process of adjusting to a diverse group of players. 

Episode Highlights: 

  • How did Jason Bell get involved in baseball and as a coach?   
  • How does Jason Bell go about designing practices? 
  • Jason Bell talks about: how to get on each player’s individual level?
  • What is Jason;s take on positive and negative affirmations?
  • What are the things Jason does to adapt his baseball style? 
  • What does Jason Bell believe team culture is? 
  • What if your players don’t seem to be adjusting to training?
  • What is his process after the practice of self-reflection?
  • What advice does Jason Bell give to be useful to a diverse group of players? 
  • What are some learning things that Jason is excited about?
  • What are things his players get excited about doing?
  • Is there anything that Jason Bell believes that other coaches might disagree with? 
  • Which things that happen during practice typically that we would notice?
  • What are some of Jason Bell’s favorite books and resources? 

 

3 Key Points:

  1. Get on each player’s level. 
  2. Research says that it should be 3-1 positive to negative affirmations.
  3. Pay attention and listen to your players. 

Tweetable Quotes:

  • “Teaching life through a game. I know what the game has done for me and how much better of a person I’ve become through the game of baseball.” – Jason Bell (00:37)
  • “We just believe that the body will self-organize itself, and you know, maybe sometimes it does. But maybe it doesn’t do it in the most powerful way.” – Jason Bell (08:10)
  • “I think the art of coaching and why we are most important is that it is our job to relate to each and every player that we have.” – Jason Bell (16:13)
  • “If there are 25 players on a team, it is more important for us to be 25 different types of people rather than 25 different people changed to our system as a coach.” – Jason Bell (16:22)
  • “You need to use feedback on the player’s body language. How he is taking the coaching that you’re giving him and kind of wonder like, ‘Man, it doesn’t look like he has bought in. Maybe he doesn’t feel comfortable disagreeing.” – Jason Bell (27:06)
  • “If this player feels like he needs more work in this area and we aren’t getting it to him, I’m so glad that he feels comfortable in saying that.” – Jason Bell (35:49)
  • “Showing where you can add value and creativity is great. But, use the creativity to like actually develop somebody’s skills and not being creative for the sake of being creative.” – Jason Bell (38:23)
  • “Communication is key. And being able to communicate with players of all sorts of backgrounds.” – Jason Bell (38:41)

Resources Mentioned: 

December 1, 2019  

Pete Caliendo- Former USA Baseball National Team Coach and Skills Development Coach.

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During this episode of Ahead of the Curve, I interviewed Peter Caliendo, Host Of Baseball Outside The Box which is an educational podcast, Former Coach for the 1999 Intercontinental Cup for USA Baseball, President of Caliendo Sports International, Vice President/Board Member of International Sports Group, Member Baseball Tournament Committee for WBSC World Baseball Softball Confederation, and Technical Committee for Confederation of Pan American Baseball. Peter Caliendo pulls from his 37 years of baseball experience, providing tips, advice, and training styles that he has learned from many other countries and cultures, such as Cuba, Japan, and the Dutch. 

 

Episode Highlights: 

  • How did Peter Caliendo start his podcast Baseball Outside The Box?
  • How did Peter get involved in baseball and as a coach?   
  • What are different countries doing in baseball training? 
  • What are some great baseball strategies in Japan?
  • What are Peter’s thoughts on Dutch training? 
  • How are other countries coaching coaches? 
  • What makes Cuba different for baseball? 
  • What are some training things that Peter is excited about? 
  • What are some things Peter may believe about baseball that other coaches may disagree with? 
  • Peter is big in having parents involved in baseball training. 
  • What are the things we would notice if we watched Peter Caliendo’s practices? 
  • What are some of Peter Caliendo’s favorite books and resources? 

3 Key Points:

  1. Peter worked with Baseball Schools USA, setting up over 60 schools in the Chicago area. 
  2. Attention to detail is key in baseball training. 
  3. Peter Caliendo was the only US coach ever to be giving courses in Cuba prior to the revolution and after. 

Tweetable Quotes:

  • “Why are we teaching things that we have been teaching in the past? It could be ok but there’s maybe better things out there.” – Peter Caliendo (00:50)
  • “As coaches, we need to have an open mind. We need to be open about what we are teaching. We need to always question what we are teaching, and always ask ‘why’?.” – Peter Caliendo (01:10)
  • “Volunteers are great people. If we didn’t have volunteers, we wouldn’t have the sport.” – Peter Caliendo (19:53)
  • “Baseball can be boring. And I have been in it for 37 years. And especially for kids because if things aren’t moving fast and things are getting better...they are going to find something else to do.” – Peter Caliendo (20:11)
  • “I would say a good 80% of coaches around the world are volunteers. There are not many getting paid and if they are, they aren’t getting paid very much. They are doing it because they love it.” – Peter Caliendo (21:03)
  • “We need to get back to free play and we need to incorporate it within our practices.” – Peter Caliendo (28:20)
  • “I’m excited about trying to keep up with the technology aspect because I really believe that what we are doing is we are utilizing the technology to tell us our we doing it correctly.” – Peter Caliendo (30:42)
  • “Don’t always do what other coaches taught you, even 10 minutes ago. If there is something you came up with, be creative yourself.” – Peter Caliendo (34:02)

Resources Mentioned: 

November 27, 2019  

Monte Lee- Head Baseball Coach, Clemson University (SC)

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During this episode of Ahead of the Curve, I interviewed Monte Lee, Head Coach of Baseball at Clemson University in Clemson, South Carolina. Coach Lee shares his passion for wanting to become a coach from a young age, the methods he uses to communicate with his team players and staff, how he goes about designing practices, and the importance of players being intentional with their pitching and hitting. 

 

Episode Highlights: 

  • What are the main reasons that Monte Lee became a baseball coach? 
  • What does Monte do to instill his teach culture? 
  • What does his fall training session look like? 
  • How does his mind work with practice design? 
  • Does he use technology with his practices?   
  • How does he intentionally develop his staff? 
  • What are some of the rules that Monte Lee has?  
  • What does a typical practice plan look like? 
  • What are they doing in the batting cages?
  • Does Monte Lee have a system for communicating within the team setting with players that don’t play regularly?   
  • What advice would he give to first-year coaches?
  • What is something that he digs into that works for learning and improving?  
  • What is something that his players love to do in practice? 
  • What is something he may do that other coaches may not do? 
  • Which resources have been helpful to Monte?

 

3 Key Points:

  1. He tries to eliminate the fear of failure. It is more about the process, not the result.   
  2. You can learn so much from just sitting back and listening.  
  3. When you do say something to a player, make sure that it matters. 

 

Tweetable Quotes:

  • “Got into coaching, really to be honest with you, I never thought about doing anything else. I just knew from a very young age.” – Monte Lee (00:47)
  • “I can remember being 15-years-old and my high school baseball coach asking me what  I wanted to do when I grew up, and I told him I want to come back and be the head baseball coach.” – Monte Lee (00:54)
  • “The first thing I tried to instill in our guys is that everything that we do on a baseball field...we are on offense.” – Monte Lee (03:28)
  • “We want our pitchers to throw every pitch with conviction and intent. We want our infielders when they are throwing the ball across the field to throw the ball with intent. We swing the bat with the intent to do damage.” – Monte Lee (04:23)
  • “I would hope that if you were to ask anybody who ever worked for me, I always wanted to make sure that everybody on my staff feels appreciated and that their voice is heard. We have staff meetings at least once a week.” – Monte Lee (21:22)
  • “We go over our team rules and our expectations and I have them sign it. It is pretty detailed. But it is pretty simple too. In a nutshell, it is just, be a good citizen.” – Monte Lee (25:29)
  • “We have two square cages and two long cages at Clemson and we have one cage that we kind of call our data cage.” – Monte Lee (037:16)
  • “You care about them and sometimes you probably don’t communicate with them as much as you would like to just because you feel bad for them. You feel bad that they are not getting the opportunity.” – Monte Lee (43:05)

 

Resources Mentioned: 

November 21, 2019  

Chase Lambin- MiLB Hitting Coach, Texas Rangers

During this episode of Ahead of the Curve, I interviewed Chase Lambin, Hitting Coach  in the Texas Rangers organization. Coach Lambin shares information about hitting, pushing players to be their own coaches, learning from everybody, creating a proper teaching environment, and how to deliver data to players without overwhelming them. 

 

Episode Highlights: 

  • How did Chase Lambin get involved in baseball and as a coach?   
  • What are some learned lessons Chase has acquired? 
  • What does the off-season look like for Chase Lambin  
  • Where does he start in the process of coaching? 
  • How does Chase relate to and get to know his players better? 
  • What does Chase Lambin say to players to access their confidence? 
  • How does he help players make better decisions? 
  • What are some different competitions that he uses with players? 
  • How does he balance individual training needs within the team setting while trying to win games? 
  • How can we filter data to players to be the most beneficial to them? 
  • Is there anything that Chase Lambin believes that other coaches might disagree with? 
  • What are some things that he works on with players on a regular basis?  
  • What are some of his favorite books and resources? 
  • Play baseball with joy. It is what we do, not who we are.  

 

3 Key Points:

  1. As a coach, be a “mentern” - a combination of a mentor and an intern.
  2. Every swing is like a snowflake. Each one is different for the situation and the moment. 
  3. Chase Lambin wants his players to be their own best coaches. 

 

Tweetable Quotes:

  • “I have a list of goals for the off-season, and all of it involves learning and growing. First off, I have to make up for lost time with my wife and kids because I think pro ball can be a bit of a grind and it puts a strain on a family.” – Chase Lambin (03:57)
  • “Everybody has something to offer. Whether it be a first-year pro player, a college kid, a 10-year big league veteran, or a coach that has coached for 40 years.” – Chase Lambin (04:47)
  • “There is no right and wrong. There is what does and does not work. I really don’t subscribe to absolutes.” – Chase Lambin (07:55)
  • “We are more psychologists than we are mechanic. I usually start with a lot of questions that have nothing to do with baseball. I try to ask about their siblings, their parents, or do they have a girlfriend.” – Chase Lambin (11:28)
  • “I think sometimes all a hitter needs to hear sometimes is that they are not alone.” – Chase Lambin (22:10)
  • “You’ve got to create the environment to teach. You’ve got to train it.” – Chase Lambin (26:14)
  • “When you make the preparation and the training as competitive as the game. It’s like getting a running start into the actual competition.” – Chase Lambin (33:10)
  • “The last thing I want to do is muddy the waters. My main job is to distill information and give it to them in digestible chunks.” – Chase Lambin (41:45)

Resources Mentioned: